Course Descriptions

AP/ASL 1000 6.0 Y AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE, LEVEL I: INTRO TO SIGN LANGUAGE STUDIES

INSTRUCTOR: TBA

PREREQUISITE: None, but interest in learning about and using ASL.

DESCRIPTION: This course focuses on developing entry-level fluency in and understanding of American Sign Language (ASL). This course provides information on the history of and perspectives on the language and the signing community in Canada with which thousands of Deaf and hearing people are associated. How this community is integrated as part of the macro-community of Canada is discussed. Information on socio-cultural values of this community is incorporated as part of this course. Students taking this course study the linguistic fundamentals of ASL and learn to use it as their second language in appropriate socio-cultural context.

Note: Students are expected NOT to use their voiced language while they are learning to use the new language in the classroom. However, voiced language (spoken English) is allowed during occasional discussion and while imparting general and specific information (with interpreters as arranged by the course director). Rationale: voiced language (spoken English) and signed language (ASL) follow a fundamentally different mode of communication rules and each language has its own rule-governed linguistic attributes that cannot mix without compromising its own language integrity.

FORMAT: Two two-hour class periods each week.

EVALUATION: Expressive skills for dialogue test – 15%, two receptive skills tests – 15% and 20%, expressive skills for monologue test – 20%, occasional quizzes – 10%, class participation and assignments – 10%, reports with reflection on Deaf Community events – 5%, voice-off rule observation – 5%.

TEXTS: Smith, C., E. M. Lentz and K. Mikos. 1988. Signing Naturally: Functional Notional Approach. Students’ Workbook, Level 1. San Diego: Dawn Sign Press. Shelly, S. and J. Schneck, 1998. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Learning Sign Language. New York: A. Simon and Schuster Macmillan Company.

AP/ASL 2000 6.0 Y AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE, LEVEL II

INSTRUCTOR: TBA

PREREQUISITE: This course is for students who have completed AP/ASL 1000 6.0 or ASL 1000 6.0 American Sign Language Level I or for those with equivalent ASL experience and competency. If students did not take ASL 1000 6.0 at York University, they will have to make an appointment with an ASL instructor for an American Sign Language Proficiency Interview /ASLPI.

DESCRIPTION: This course offers lessons on advanced ASL Linguistics and gives the opportunity to use the language in formal and informal situations. The students will work phrases and non-manual signs. They will work on proper turn-taking, eye gazing, role shifting and leave taking. This course emphasizes receptive and expressive skills with ASL. By the end of the course, through lessons and interacting with others in the classroom and community, students are expected to have acquired the following knowledge and competency: appropriate use of non-manual grammatical features; knowledge and use of ASLI and II linguistics and vocabulary; knowledge of non-manual signals; knowledge of non-manual behaviours; appropriate incorporation of the eyes, face, and body parts in overall ASL structure; knowledge and use of ASL discourse; ability to finger spell and read finger spelling; knowledge of when finger spelling is allowed and when not; knowledge and use of advanced ASL classifiers; ability to give and understand directions and instructions in ASL; ability to retell and paraphrase information in ASL; ability to tell a story in ASL, alone or with a partner; and appropriate use of turn taking and eye contact rules.

This course also provides the opportunities for students to become familiar with aspects of the Deaf community and some Deaf Culture information through real-life participation and video viewing, as well as through the information available in the course materials.

Note: Students are NOT allowed to use voice during any normal teaching and learning session in the classroom except from time to time when the course director has arranged to have an interpreter present. Rationale for the NO VOICE rule: It becomes easier to learn and appreciate ASL as a highly sophisticated language. It would be helpful if students avoid “Thinking in English” when learning and using ASL.

Students are encouraged NOT to take written notes during ASL lessons and in related activities. Instead students are expected to focus on developing their visual memory and receptive-expressive ASL skills. Students MAY take notes while reviewing video shows and interpreted discussion with the course director.

FORMAT: Two two-hour class periods each week

EVALUATION: Fall test: evaluation of expressive skills (dialogue) – 20%, test: evaluation of receptive skills (written paper) – 20%, Spring test: evaluation of expressive skills (monologue) – 20%, Test: evaluation of receptive skills (written paper) – 20%, class participation and assignments – 10%, report on an involvement with Deaf Community events – 5%, voice-off rule observation – 5%

TEXTS: Smith, C., E. M. Lentz and K. Mikos. 1998. Signing Naturally: Functional Notional Approach. Students’ Workbook, Level 2. San Diego: Dawn Sign Press. Shelly, S., and J. Schneck. 1998. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Learning Sign Language. New York; A. Simon and Schuster Macmillan Company. Bailey, Carole Sue and Kathy Dolby. 2002. The Canadian Dictionary of ASL. The University of Alberta.

AP/ASL 3000 6.0 Y AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE, LEVEL III

INSTRUCTOR: TBA

PREREQUISITE: AS/ASL 2000 6.0 or AP/ASL 2000 6.0, a rating of 2.0 or better on the ASL Proficiency Interview (ASLPI); or permission of the instructor.

DESCRIPTION: This course includes eight instructional units. Each unit focuses on different language skills. Some of the units focus on building narrative skills, moving from an informal to a more formal presentation. Others focus on developing conversational skills used in everyday discussion. Several units focus on developing the language skills needed to explain ideas, or concepts; or how things work and why things are the way they are. Some of these units also help develop skills in translating written text into ASL.
Note: Students are expected NOT to use their voiced language while they are learning to use the immersion language in the classroom. However, voiced language (spoken English) is allowed during occasional discussion and while imparting general and specific information (with interpreters as arranged by the course director). Rationale: voiced language (spoken English) and signed language (ASL) follow a fundamentally different mode of communication rules and each language has its own rule-governed linguistic attributes that cannot mix without compromising its own language integrity.

FORMAT: Four contact hours per week.

EVALUATION: Midterm examination (expressive skills) – 20%; final examination (expressive skills) – 20%; five assignments (each 10%) – 50%; signed project (ASL literature) – 10%.

TEXTS: Smith, C., E. Lentz and K. Mikos. 2001. Signing Naturally: Functional Notional Approach. Students’ Workbook. Level 3. San Diego: Dawn Sign Press. Shelly, S. and J. Schneck. 1998. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Learning Sign Language. New York: A Simon and Schuster Macmillan Company. Bailey, Carole Sue and Kathy Dolby. 2002. The Canadian Dictionary of ASL. The University of Alberta Press.